‘There are no legally recognised circumstances under which a person younger than the appointed age for consent to medical treatment is capable of giving consent to treatment without involving a parent or guardian’, says an angry parent who is very touchy on the subject of contraception for teenage girls being prescribed by GPs Is the parent’s view supported in the Act?

‘There are no legally recognised circumstances under which a person younger than the appointed age for consent to medical treatment is capable of giving consent to treatment without involving a parent or guardian’, says an angry parent who is very touchy on the subject of contraception for teenage girls being prescribed by GPs

 

Is the parent’s view supported in the Act?

 

The answer

No. The parent is ignorant of the CMT & PCA because a person younger than 16 years can consent to medical treatment on two circumstances as defined by the Act. First, if the medical practitioner to provide treatment is of the opinion that the child is capable of understanding the nature, consequences and risk of treatment which is in the best interest of the child’s well being. Secondly, that the opinion is supported by a written opinion of at least one other medical practitioner who personally examines the child before treatment is started (s12 (b) (i) (ii)).

 

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