ASSIGNMENT 3: SELF-REFLECTIVE PORTFOLIO

Worth: 35%
Length: Max. 6.5 pages
Due Date: 10 pm Wednesday 2nd Nov (via Turnitin) (see subject guide)
Task: Students are required to submit an individual self-reflection portfolio consisting of three sections:
1. A pre-subject reflection on student�s main assumptions and expectations on the subject including tensions students have identified in their experience with managing, leading, stewardship: 2 pages.
2. A mid-subject reflection on learning/changes/tensions as a result of in-class and out-of-class discussions/materials/experiences; students must include a reflection on the �lived case� that will be role played in class. This section requires students to identify major learning and changes as well as new/ongoing tensions/open questions: 2 pages.
3. A post-subject reflection on learning in this subject. In this section, students are required to reflect on their experience in the subject, what they have learnt, what has changed for them, what tensions were resolved, what tensions remained or what new tensions opened: 2 pages.
4. A concluding � page has to be included on the student own philosophy of managing, leading & stewardship. This � page needs to articulate the student�s own action-guiding principles and how these will guide the student�s judgements and actions in the future.

Students will have to bring a work-in-progress self-reflective portfolio to two of the tutorials (see subject guide) and provide peer assessment to another student.

Please note: No portfolio will be assessed without peer-assessment.

What is a self-reflective portfolio?
A self-reflective portfolio is a collection of thoughts, ideas, concerns and reflections on your learning as you take the journey over the course of this subject. You should reflect on your original assumptions, what you are learning, what is changing and how you are putting into practice what you are learning as you study. Your reflections must include:
– your original assumptions of managing, leading, stewardship and your expectations of the subject
– your experiences in the seminars
– your thoughts while reading and reflecting
– thoughts and feelings from your learning that you notice have entered your head while working and dealing with organisational and management issues and problems
– thoughts and feelings during and after completing exercises, doing your individual and group assignments and so on.
The self-reflective portfolio must be a creative piece. It is advised that students take notes from their first session which they will use to complete the portfolio.

Why a self-reflective portfolio?
Several studies in management education, and postgraduate education generally, have provided strong evidence that reflective learning is one of the most critical and powerful components to lifelong learning (Gustavs and Clegg, 2005). Many studies have shown that when students are asked to keep journals the impact of learning is far greater, richer and rewarding- this is especially so when approached creatively and symbolically [through art for example] (Barry, 1996).

You are doing a self-reflective portfolio because it will facilitate your learning in a way that how you think and what you think is influenced by what you learn. Typically, what you know usually affects what you do. Hence, the portfolio aims to bridge the gap between what you think and what you do (i.e. Theory and Practice or the Knowing-Doing Gap), while at the same time developing and improving the knowledge and how it is applied.

How do I keep and present a self-reflective portfolio?
It is strongly advised that students keep notes from their first session in this subject which they then can use to complete the self-reflective portfolio.

While we do not want to determine what students� creativity will look like, we do have to place some boundaries around the self-reflective portfolio in order to ensure it serves its purpose. The self-reflective portfolio must contain the following:
� Four sections of entries: One at the start of the subject, one half-way through (written mid-April), one after the last session and an outlook for the future.
� A description of thoughts and feelings before starting the subject, at mid-point and after finishing the last session.
� Discussions of how you implemented or utilised learning from this subject in practical ways.
� Students can include a collage of creative works; references to movies, readings, and news paper articles; proverbs and metaphors, drawings, cartoons, etc that have either caused you to reflect on the topics discussed in class or exemplified an issue or topic covered in class or in your readings and discussions and assignments.
� A final entry of about � page that seeks to synthesise all your entries and bring together all your key learning including the articulation of your personal philosophy of managing and leading.
� We are not too fussed how students present their portfolios. Students may type it using word (etc), or can keep an art scrapbook. Students can do a combination of both, and print their word documents, cut them up and place them in the scrapbook. Use whatever is most comfortable with. However, please do not handwrite as handwriting is almost always difficult to read.

MARKING CRITERIA

Weighting
Pre-subject reflection (max 2 pages)
– Overview of main assumptions about managing, leading, stewardship
– Statement of expectations on the subject
– Identification of key areas/topics related to managing, leading, stewardship that are of concern to the student or create tensions
10
Mid-subject reflection (max 2 pages)
– Depth of thinking and reflection (inside knowledge communicated and contemplated intra-personally): How well does the student demonstrate his take up of new knowledge in the class? Does the student think about how well his existing knowledge is working for him in his everyday practice, and what needs to or has changed in terms of his thinking?
– Transference (inside knowledge applied outwards): How well does the student show that s/he is able to integrate the knowledge learned in class and apply it into practice? Does s/he provide well thought out examples?
– Perceptions and interpretations (outside environments turned inwards): How well does the student demonstrate an ability to read his/her environment and make sense of it with his/her newfound knowledge? That is, what signs, symbols and stimuli catch his/her attention and how is s/he making sense of these things.
10
Post-subject reflection (max. 2 pages)
– Depth of thinking and reflection (inside knowledge communicated and contemplated intrapersonally): How well does the student demonstrate his development during the subject? What has changed? What hasn�t changed?
– Transference (inside knowledge applied outwards): How well does the student show that s/he is able to integrate the knowledge learned in class and apply it into practice? Has the student developed own action-guiding principles?
– Perceptions and interpretations (outside environments turned inwards): How well does the student demonstrate an ability to read his/her environment and make sense of it with his/her newfound knowledge? That is, what signs, symbols and stimuli catch his/her attention and how is s/he making sense of these things.
10
Individual action-guiding principles (max � page)
– Demonstration of in-depth understanding of student�s role in society
– Demonstration of a genuine commitment to realistic individual action-guiding principles and examples of how these will guide the student�s judgements and actions in the future.
5
TOTAL MARKS
35

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